Disruptive naïve art on show at Musée Maillol

Disruptive naïve art on show at Musée Maillol

Naïve art emerged in the late 19th century through artworks by mostly self-taught artists from modest backgrounds who challenged the established institutions. The slightly condescending term, ‘naïve art’, was therefore used. In Quebec, it is called ‘Art Indiscipliné’ (disruptive art), which is probably a more accurate name. The artists ignore the academic rules, do not worry at all about perspective and use bright colours. They express what they feel. This creates genuine power and a wonderfully fresh ingeniousness free of any trickery.

At Musée Maillol until 19 January, you can see over a hundred artworks at the ‘From Douanier Rousseau to Séraphine, the great naïve masters’ exhibition. Henri Rousseau and Séraphine Louis are of course featured, along with other artists including André Bauchant, Camille Bombois, Ferdinand Desnos, Jean Ève, René Rimbert, Dominique Peyronnet and Louis Vivin. Located in the 7th arrondissement, the museum is only 20 minutes from our Star Champs Élysées Hotel (Line 1 metro from Charles de Gaulle Étoile station to Concorde station, then line 12 to Rue du Bac).

Séraphine Louis, Les Grappes de raisin, 1928-1929, huile sur toile, 195 x 130 cm, Courtesy galerie Dina Vierny, Photo : © Jean-Louis Losi

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